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Micronutrients vs. Coronavirus (COVID-19)

It is easy to forget that our bodies are literally being continually rebuilt by what we eat and drink. Food and water contain essential nutrients which our bodies and brains absolutely need.

These compounds enable our amazing biological machines to function. They are vital for energy, mood, growth, repair, disease prevention and for overcoming a disease, like virus COVID-19.

Forget carnivore, herbivore, vegetarian, vegan, plant-based and organic for a while, and please put carb, ketone and calorie focused diets to one side just for now.

There’ll be no lecturing about what we shouldn’t be eating because while all of these are super important topics, they can also be overwhelming and divisive.

Nutrient density, or nutrient-dense foods, “refers to the content of micronutrients relative to energy in food or diets.”

In order to immediately begin increasing our health (and immune system), we simply need to introduce more nutrient-dense foods, or micronutrients, into our diet.

Micronutrients

Micronutrients are vitamins and minerals contained in foods in small amounts; yet they are what’s essential for optimal immune function, blood flow, fluid balance and countless other chemical processes.

Water also contains essential minerals, so drink LOTS of water.

As you can see from the micronutrient food list below, many of the world’s most nutrient-dense foods are common foods found in normal supermarkets and shops around the world.

Plan meals by eating LOADS of foods from the list below, and you will already be repairing and rebuilding your body at the cellular level for optimal health and fitness. Remember that vitamins and minerals are the body’s main building blocks.

Be sure to read to the bottom where I give some final comments on drinks, milk products, corn and fructose, and consider signing up for updates from me.

Some of the most nutrient-dense foods on the planet:

avocados

almonds

asparagus

bell peppers

berries (blueberries, raspberries, strawberries)

black-eyed peas

broccoli

brussels sprouts

cacao / dark chocolate (at least 70%)

cabbage

carrots

cauliflower

cashews

chia seeds

chickpeas

collard greens

flax (linseeds)

garlic

ginger

hemp seeds

pastured eggs

kale

kidney beans

lettuce

liver

mangoes

mushrooms

mustard greens

okra

onions

pak choi

peanuts

pecan nuts

prunes

radishes / radish greens

salmon

sardines

sauerkraut

seaweed

shellfish

spinach

spirulina

squash (pumpkin)

sweet potatoes

tofu

turmeric

turnip greens

walnuts

watermelon

wheat germ

Download PDF List


The Takeaway

The road to longevity and the highest quality of health and life can take different first steps, but none are more powerful than the food we put into our bodies.

If you are interested in diving deeper, I recommend Harvard University’s nutrients list.

Simply replace what you are eating now with as many micronutrient-dense foods as possible, and you will be boosting your immune system, your mood, energy levels, and enabling your body to rebuild into a disease fighting machine.

In the next article, I will explain macronutrients (carbohydrates, protein and fat). I hope you found this information very useful.

Let me know which micronutrients you regularly eat and recommend. 🙂

notes: milk products like cheese and yogurt are not included because of lactose intolerance and other risks; eat bell peppers (nightshades) with caution; sweetcorn is a high carb (starchy) overeaten grain (not a vegetable) with low nutrient-density compared to veg; most fruits are high in sugar (fructose) and the same micronutrients are also available in veg (one bell pepper has more vitamin c than an orange); water, all tea, some coffee and occasional red wine is healthy, fruit juices, sodas and alcohol in general are not. This article does not substitute medical professional advice.

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Teaching at Nottingham University, Summer 2019

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